So This $55 Tasting Menu Sounds Like a Great Deal but It's Not.4

Huertas is a very good restaurant, but there’s a serious opportunity cost involved with the no-choice tasting menu. Would you rather have FIVE courses per person at $55 each, with every patron sharing the same rustic dish? Or would you rather choose from the restaurant’s a larger, more affordable selection of 25 dishes plus passed plates and daily specials?

The answer is obvious.

Over at Eater we publish our first ever Shake Shack Index! How much you spend at Danny Meyer’s burger chain depends on what country you’re located in. Pay attention to the Dubai International Airport prices, as it’s the seventh-most trafficked airport in the world, which means even if you’re not planning on moving to the Middle East, you might end up spending a lot on Shack Shack in Dubai if that’s where you flight is routed through!

Over at Eater we publish our first ever Shake Shack Index! How much you spend at Danny Meyer’s burger chain depends on what country you’re located in. Pay attention to the Dubai International Airport prices, as it’s the seventh-most trafficked airport in the world, which means even if you’re not planning on moving to the Middle East, you might end up spending a lot on Shack Shack in Dubai if that’s where you flight is routed through!

American diners aren’t accustomed to paying as much for food as their foreign counterparts. As a result, U.S. restaurants make more of their money from liquor markups. Sometimes, however, the prices get a little bit ridiculous. This chart shows what’s you’d pay for Johnnie Walker Blue (normally $200), if you purchased a bottle’s worth of shots in any of these fancypants restaurants. Crazy, right? Click through to Eater for the full interactive graph!

American diners aren’t accustomed to paying as much for food as their foreign counterparts. As a result, U.S. restaurants make more of their money from liquor markups. Sometimes, however, the prices get a little bit ridiculous. This chart shows what’s you’d pay for Johnnie Walker Blue (normally $200), if you purchased a bottle’s worth of shots in any of these fancypants restaurants. Crazy, right? Click through to Eater for the full interactive graph!

You’ll Spend Over $1,000 on Next’s New Menu

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Dinner for two at Next, a Chicago restaurant that overhauls its entire menu three times a year, will cost over $500 per person in its latest iteration, we report over at Eater. Yeah, that’s a lot of money.

The menu, which revisits the time chef Grant Achtatz spent at Trio before he opened Alinea, starts at $245 during off-peak hours and reaches $255 on Friday and Saturday nights. Wine pairings are $138. Add on Chicago sales tax (10.5%) and the service charge (20%) and you’re at $1,015 for two. 

Trio appears to be Next’s most expensive menu to date. Previously, the el Bulli service was $365 with pairings. Last year’s Bocuse d’Or menu, by contrast, was $313 with regular pairings, or $363 with reserve wines. The Trio service is spendiest of all, at $383-$393 before tax and tip. As is the case with every menu at Next, tables are booked by paying for the full price of the meal in advance, via the restaurant’s online ticketing system.

So what say you world. Is Next’s new menu a BUY HOLD OR SELL?

Qui is the latest addition to America’s slew of ticketed tasting menu restaurants, as Eater Austin reports. The cost is $120 per person for 20-25 courses. Thing is, unlike traditional pay-ahead venues like Alinea and Next, where the diner pays the full price of the meal (plus tax and tip), when the reservation is made, Qui only charges the card in the event of a late cancellation, which perhaps means that Qui isn’t really a ticketed restaurant. Still, we’ll take it! 

Qui is the latest addition to America’s slew of ticketed tasting menu restaurants, as Eater Austin reports. The cost is $120 per person for 20-25 courses. Thing is, unlike traditional pay-ahead venues like Alinea and Next, where the diner pays the full price of the meal (plus tax and tip), when the reservation is made, Qui only charges the card in the event of a late cancellation, which perhaps means that Qui isn’t really a ticketed restaurant. Still, we’ll take it! 

What you’re looking at is octopus pastrami, an edible ode to a cobblestone street. It’s part of the set menu at Batard in Tribeca, which I awarded two stars in my review for Eater! The cost is $55 for two courses, $65 for three courses, or $75 for four. That’s a heck of a lot cheaper than Drew Nieporent’s previous restaurant in the same space, Corton, where tasting menus were $125 and $155. And even though the food isn’t necessarily as exciting as Corton was, the new prices reflect an unusual return to affordability in fine dining. Cool, right?

What you’re looking at is octopus pastrami, an edible ode to a cobblestone street. It’s part of the set menu at Batard in Tribeca, which I awarded two stars in my review for Eater! The cost is $55 for two courses, $65 for three courses, or $75 for four. That’s a heck of a lot cheaper than Drew Nieporent’s previous restaurant in the same space, Corton, where tasting menus were $125 and $155. And even though the food isn’t necessarily as exciting as Corton was, the new prices reflect an unusual return to affordability in fine dining. Cool, right?

Here’s a photo of the foie gras, black truffle and chicken pot pie at The NoMad Bar ($36). It’s brought to us by the team behind Eleven Madison Park, where dinner for two can easily hit $1,000. The NoMad tries to do for pub fare what Carbone does for Italian-American fare; it aims to make a “cheap” cuisine fancy and expensive. The intention is noble and the pot pie is delicious; too bad much of the food is the epitome of average, as I write in my one-star Eater review (Photo: Daniel Krieger/Eater).

Here’s a photo of the foie gras, black truffle and chicken pot pie at The NoMad Bar ($36). It’s brought to us by the team behind Eleven Madison Park, where dinner for two can easily hit $1,000. The NoMad tries to do for pub fare what Carbone does for Italian-American fare; it aims to make a “cheap” cuisine fancy and expensive. The intention is noble and the pot pie is delicious; too bad much of the food is the epitome of average, as I write in my one-star Eater review (Photo: Daniel Krieger/Eater).

This is Dover’s Caviar Pie. It looks great but it tastes not so great. The problem is that it’s made with crummy paddlefish roe, which sits atop an overchilled parfait of hard boiled egg, cream cheese and sour cream. Cost: $35. Rating: SELL. To be fair, using higher grade hackleback would probably push this dish up to a $60, while using transmontanus sturgeon would easily raise the price to $85, but both of those preparations would be a heck of a lot more compelling than this one. 
Saving money is nice, but sometimes, an expensive, high-quality product can feel like a value, while a shoddy, cheaper substitute can feel like a rip-off. This is one of those times. See my full review of the otherwise very good Dover on Eater! (Photo: Daniel Krieger/Eater)

This is Dover’s Caviar Pie. It looks great but it tastes not so great. The problem is that it’s made with crummy paddlefish roe, which sits atop an overchilled parfait of hard boiled egg, cream cheese and sour cream. Cost: $35. Rating: SELL. To be fair, using higher grade hackleback would probably push this dish up to a $60, while using transmontanus sturgeon would easily raise the price to $85, but both of those preparations would be a heck of a lot more compelling than this one. 

Saving money is nice, but sometimes, an expensive, high-quality product can feel like a value, while a shoddy, cheaper substitute can feel like a rip-off. This is one of those times. See my full review of the otherwise very good Dover on Eater! (Photo: Daniel Krieger/Eater)