Qui is the latest addition to America’s slew of ticketed tasting menu restaurants, as Eater Austin reports. The cost is $120 per person for 20-25 courses. Thing is, unlike traditional pay-ahead venues like Alinea and Next, where the diner pays the full price of the meal (plus tax and tip), when the reservation is made, Qui only charges the card in the event of a late cancellation, which perhaps means that Qui isn’t really a ticketed restaurant. Still, we’ll take it! 

Qui is the latest addition to America’s slew of ticketed tasting menu restaurants, as Eater Austin reports. The cost is $120 per person for 20-25 courses. Thing is, unlike traditional pay-ahead venues like Alinea and Next, where the diner pays the full price of the meal (plus tax and tip), when the reservation is made, Qui only charges the card in the event of a late cancellation, which perhaps means that Qui isn’t really a ticketed restaurant. Still, we’ll take it! 

Here’s a photo of the foie gras, black truffle and chicken pot pie at The NoMad Bar ($36). It’s brought to us by the team behind Eleven Madison Park, where dinner for two can easily hit $1,000. The NoMad tries to do for pub fare what Carbone does for Italian-American fare; it aims to make a “cheap” cuisine fancy and expensive. The intention is noble and the pot pie is delicious; too bad much of the food is the epitome of average, as I write in my one-star Eater review (Photo: Daniel Krieger/Eater).

Here’s a photo of the foie gras, black truffle and chicken pot pie at The NoMad Bar ($36). It’s brought to us by the team behind Eleven Madison Park, where dinner for two can easily hit $1,000. The NoMad tries to do for pub fare what Carbone does for Italian-American fare; it aims to make a “cheap” cuisine fancy and expensive. The intention is noble and the pot pie is delicious; too bad much of the food is the epitome of average, as I write in my one-star Eater review (Photo: Daniel Krieger/Eater).

This is Dover’s Caviar Pie. It looks great but it tastes not so great. The problem is that it’s made with crummy paddlefish roe, which sits atop an overchilled parfait of hard boiled egg, cream cheese and sour cream. Cost: $35. Rating: SELL. To be fair, using higher grade hackleback would probably push this dish up to a $60, while using transmontanus sturgeon would easily raise the price to $85, but both of those preparations would be a heck of a lot more compelling than this one. 
Saving money is nice, but sometimes, an expensive, high-quality product can feel like a value, while a shoddy, cheaper substitute can feel like a rip-off. This is one of those times. See my full review of the otherwise very good Dover on Eater! (Photo: Daniel Krieger/Eater)

This is Dover’s Caviar Pie. It looks great but it tastes not so great. The problem is that it’s made with crummy paddlefish roe, which sits atop an overchilled parfait of hard boiled egg, cream cheese and sour cream. Cost: $35. Rating: SELL. To be fair, using higher grade hackleback would probably push this dish up to a $60, while using transmontanus sturgeon would easily raise the price to $85, but both of those preparations would be a heck of a lot more compelling than this one. 

Saving money is nice, but sometimes, an expensive, high-quality product can feel like a value, while a shoddy, cheaper substitute can feel like a rip-off. This is one of those times. See my full review of the otherwise very good Dover on Eater! (Photo: Daniel Krieger/Eater)

Jean-Georges has raised its prices by $10 across the board, as we reported yesterday on Eater. So the prix-fixe is now $128; the tasting menus are $208; and the long tasting is $308. But for those who want EVEN MORE data, check out our HISTORICAL chart for the Central Park West restaurant. Fact: a fully loaded-meal can you $226 more now that it did a few years back!!!

Jean-Georges has raised its prices by $10 across the board, as we reported yesterday on Eater. So the prix-fixe is now $128; the tasting menus are $208; and the long tasting is $308. But for those who want EVEN MORE data, check out our HISTORICAL chart for the Central Park West restaurant. Fact: a fully loaded-meal can you $226 more now that it did a few years back!!!

Paul Qui Is the Latest Chef to Go Tasting Menu-Only. Cost: $100.4

The year-old Austin restaurant will open its long-awaited tasting room this summer and will charge $100 for 20-25 courses, Eater reports. That’s pretty gosh darn reasonable considering that a meal of that length will cost $195 at Blanca in Brooklyn or Atera in Manhattan. The main dining room will also offer a shorter set menu at $60. 

As Eater mentions, Qui is just one in a long list of restaurants to reduce consumer choice in favor of providing a more consistent guest experience; the move should also theoretically allow Qui to cut down on food costs by reducing the amount of excess product they need to buy for an a la carte menu.

This is oxtail with beef broth and spicy-as-hell Japanese mustard. This is what you absolutely must eat at Ivan Ramen, the subject of my two star review for Eater today. The dish costs just $9 and in case you’re wondering nothing on the food or sake-by-the-glass menu is more than $15.
It’s not uncommon for new restaurants to offer lower-than-market prices during their opening months as an extended friends & family discount, but Ivan Ramen said during the fact-checking process that this is not the case here. “We at Ivan Ramen really want to be a neighbor location and our pricing reflects that.” Rating: STRONG BUY (Photo: Nick Solares/Eater).  

This is oxtail with beef broth and spicy-as-hell Japanese mustard. This is what you absolutely must eat at Ivan Ramen, the subject of my two star review for Eater today. The dish costs just $9 and in case you’re wondering nothing on the food or sake-by-the-glass menu is more than $15.

It’s not uncommon for new restaurants to offer lower-than-market prices during their opening months as an extended friends & family discount, but Ivan Ramen said during the fact-checking process that this is not the case here. “We at Ivan Ramen really want to be a neighbor location and our pricing reflects that.” Rating: STRONG BUY (Photo: Nick Solares/Eater).  

People of Earth!!! Remember how lunch at Jean-Georges used to be pretty cheap, costing $28 for two plates about four years ago? Then it rose to $38 for two plates and $19 for each additional course? Well, now the lunch prix-fixe is $48!!! And extra courses are $24!! You’re still saving money when compared to dinner, but is it still a DEAL amid Midtown’s crowded lunch scene? Click through to Eater where we crunch the numbers for you!!!

People of Earth!!! Remember how lunch at Jean-Georges used to be pretty cheap, costing $28 for two plates about four years ago? Then it rose to $38 for two plates and $19 for each additional course? Well, now the lunch prix-fixe is $48!!! And extra courses are $24!! You’re still saving money when compared to dinner, but is it still a DEAL amid Midtown’s crowded lunch scene? Click through to Eater where we crunch the numbers for you!!!

BLACK TRUFFLES are back on the menu at Per Se thanks to the Australian winter crop that’s starting to come in! The price is $125 per serving, the same as last year but up from $100 back in 2012! Click through to find out precisely how much you’ll spend on all the supplements at Thomas Keller’s three Michelin-starred restaurant! (Photo: Ryan Sutton/Eater).

BLACK TRUFFLES are back on the menu at Per Se thanks to the Australian winter crop that’s starting to come in! The price is $125 per serving, the same as last year but up from $100 back in 2012! Click through to find out precisely how much you’ll spend on all the supplements at Thomas Keller’s three Michelin-starred restaurant! (Photo: Ryan Sutton/Eater).

Take Root in Carroll Gardens announced yesterday that the menu price will rise to $105 in July, a not insignificant HIKE of $20. That surely makes Take Root the most expensive restaurant in South Brooklyn (Park Slope, Carroll Gardens, Boerum Hill, Red Hook), though it remains tons cheaper than Blanca, The Little Elm or Brooklyn Fare. Click through for the full EATER interactive chart to find out how much you’ll spend — and to find out why the price is going up!!!

Take Root in Carroll Gardens announced yesterday that the menu price will rise to $105 in July, a not insignificant HIKE of $20. That surely makes Take Root the most expensive restaurant in South Brooklyn (Park Slope, Carroll Gardens, Boerum Hill, Red Hook), though it remains tons cheaper than Blanca, The Little Elm or Brooklyn Fare. Click through for the full EATER interactive chart to find out how much you’ll spend — and to find out why the price is going up!!!

Sushi Nakazawa Embraces Demand-Based Pricing.4

Sushi Nakazawa charges $120 for a sushi omakase in the dining room, and $150 for the same meal at the bar. What accounts for the difference? We’re definitely pricing on demand, says co-owner Alessandro Borgognone, whom I quote in my three-star review for Eater. Borgognone believes that guests will pay a premium for the theater of watching chef Nakazawa rip the head off a live spot prawn. His belief is correct.

The Price Hike is a big supporter of demand-based pricing when it works. Whether it works here is more complicated. From a value perspective, $120 is below average for this level of sushi, so a $30 surcharge to $150 shouldn’t make a big difference to most. But demand-based pricing isn’t just about magically giving the guest a feeling of value despite the higher price. The policy should also create a bit more slack in demand, and that hasn’t really happened here, as the bar seats are snapped up almost instantly. Then again, if a restaurant raises the price too much it runs the risk not just of alienating its own clientele but of becoming the subject of price gouging allegations. So it’s a tough balance to strike. 

Is Sushi Nakazawa’s demand-based pricing a BUY HOLD OR SELL?